Connect with us

Bioengineer

ETRI, DGIST develop new electrode structure for all-solid-state secondary battery

All-solid-state electrodes composed of graphite active material and no solid electrolyte. Energy density was improved by 150% through research on

Published

on

All-solid-state electrodes composed of graphite active material and no solid electrolyte. Energy density was improved by 150% through research on the particle diffusion process.

South Korean researchers have developed a new type of electrode structure for all-solid-state secondary batteries. If this technology is adopted, the energy density of the batteries could increase significantly when compared to existing technologies, contributing tremendously to the development of high-performance secondary batteries.

A joint research team from Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) and Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) announced that it had designed a new electrode structure for all-solid-state secondary batteries after identifying the mechanism of facile lithium-ion diffusion between active materials. The achievement received international recognition when the results were published by the ACS Energy Letters, an international online academic journal specializing in the energy sector which is run by the American Chemical Society (ACS)*.

Unlike primary cells that can be only used once and never be able to be reused, secondary batteries can be recharged and used repeatedly. With the recent advances in electronic devices, the importance of secondary battery technology to robots, electric cars, energy storage systems (ESS), and drones is growing year by year.

All-solid-state secondary battery is a next-generation energy storage device that uses a solid electrolyte to transport ions within battery electrodes. Solid electrolytes are safer than liquid electrolytes which can cause a fire. Moreover, solid electrolytes can be implemented in a bipolar-type secondary cell* to increase energy density by a simple battery configuration.

The electrode structure of a conventional all-solid-state secondary cell consists of a solid electrolyte responsible for ionic conduction, a conductive additive that provides the means for electron conduction; active material responsible for storing energy; and a binder that holds these constituent parts physically and chemically.

ETRI researchers discovered through systematic experiments, however, that ions are transported even between graphite active material particles. And they proposed a new type of electrode structure for all-solid-state secondary cell consisting of only the active material and the binder. The researchers confirmed the possibility that even without a solid electrolyte additive within the electrodes, the performance of an all-solid-state secondary cell could be superior.

The theoretical feasibility of the novel structure proposed by ETRI was verified at DGIST through electrochemical testing (using a supercomputer) of a virtual model. ETRI researchers succeeded in demonstrating this structure in an actual experiment. ETRI named this technology ‘diffusion-dependent all-solid-state electrode’ and submitted a paper to an international journal.

If ETRI’s technology is adopted, solid conduction additive material will become unnecessary in the electrode; instead, the more active material can be squeezed into the same volume. In other words, the amount of active material in the electrode can increase by up to 98wt%* and as a result, the energy density* can be made 1.5 times greater than the conventional graphite composite electrode.

The technology offers advantages in manufacturing process aspects as well. Sulfide-type solid electrolytes*, which have high ion conductivity and moderate plasticity, are regarded as an excellent candidate for the fabrication of all-solid-state batteries. But due to its high chemical reactivity*, the sulfide-type solid electrolytes leave battery developers with very few options when it comes to solvents and binders. In contrast, with the new ETRI electrode, developers can freely select the type of solvent and binder to use in the battery because the electrode contains no solid electrolytes that are highly reactive. This also permits researchers to pursue new approaches for improving the performance of all-solid-state secondary cells.

Dr. Young-Gi Lee, who was involved in this research, said, “We have revealed for the first time that ions can be diffused just with active materials. We are no longer bound to the structure used in existing all-solid-state secondary cells. We plan to develop secondary cells with even high energy densities, using this technology. We will also secure our rights to the core technology and work on a version that could be commercialized.”

Although ETRI conducted its research using graphite cathode active material, it intends to continue its research based on the same concept, using various other electrode materials. It is also planning to enhance the technology in order to increase efficiency. This can be accomplished by eliminating the interfacial issues between electrodes and thinning the volume of electrodes.

###

Glossary description:

* ACS Energy Letters IF: 19.003, Electrochemistry JCR: 98.148

* a bipolar-type secondary cell: High energy density secondary cell containing several electrodes connected in series with a single rechargeable battery cell.

* Mass percentage: In chemistry, the mass percentage of a substance in a mixture is the ratio of the mass of the substance to the total mass of the mixture.

* ETRI’s electrode: >640 mAh/cm3, conventional graphite composite electrode: ~400 mAh/cm3.

* Compounds containing or binding to a sulfide ion (S²-) in the formula

* When sulfur (S) and moisture (H2O) meet, hydrogen sulfide, a toxic gas, is released.

About Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI):

ETRI is a non-profit government-funded research institute. Since its foundation in 1976, ETRI, a global ICT research institute, has been making its immense effort to provide Korea a remarkable growth in the field of ICT industry. ETRI delivers Korea as one of the top ICT nations in the World, by unceasingly developing world’s first and best technologies.

This research was carried jointly with Prof. Yong Min Lee and his team from DGIST under the auspices of ETRI. The first authors of the paper are Dr. Ju Young Kim of ETRI and Dr. Joonam Park of DGIST. The corresponding authors of the paper are Dr. Ju Young Kim of ETRI and Prof. Yong Min Lee of DGIST, and the research was funded by the Ministry of Science and ICT as part of the Climate Change Response Technology Development Project (National Research Foundation of Korea).

An article explaining the results of this research was published in the latest issue of ACS Energy Letters, a renowned international journal in the Energy field (IF:19.003).

Unlike primary cells that can be only used once and never be able to be reused, secondary batteries can be recharged and used repeatedly. With the recent advances in electronic devices, the importance of secondary battery technology to robots, electric cars, energy storage systems (ESS), and drones is growing year by year.

Source: https://bioengineer.org/etri-dgist-develop-new-electrode-structure-for-all-solid-state-secondary-battery/

etri,-dgist-develop-new-electrode-structure-for-all-solid-state-secondary-battery

Bioengineer

Sex differences in COVID-19 outcomes

Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers In a study of more than 10,600 adult patients hospitalized with COVID-19, women had

Published

on

In a study of more than 10,600 adult patients hospitalized with COVID-19, women had significantly lower odds than men of in-hospital mortality. They also had fewer admissions to the intensive care unit and less need for mechanical ventilation. Women also had significantly lower odds of major adverse events, including acute cardiac injury, acute kidney injury, and venous thromboembolism, according to an article in the peer-reviewed Journal of Women’s Health. Click here to read the article now.

“This comprehensive analysis is the largest study to date that directly assesses the impact of sex on COVID-19 outcomes,” stated Rachel-Maria Brown, MD, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, and coauthors. “Our study strongly demonstrates female sex to be associated with lower odds of in-hospital outcomes, major adverse effects and all-cause mortality as compared to male sex after controlling for confounding variables.” The authors propose some of the protective factors that may contribute to these findings.

In the accompanying editorial entitled “Lessons Learned from COVID-19 Sex Disparities,” Annabelle Santos Volgman, MD, Rush University Medical Center, and coauthors, suggest various mechanisms by which female sex may confer a protective advantage against COVID-19 infection. One advantage may be the extra X chromosome, which carries multiple genes responsible for innate and adaptive immunity.

Volgman and coauthors emphasize that “although women have less mortality risk with COVID-19, we need to exercise caution not to send a message to deliver subpar care to women with COVID-19 or decrease measures to prevent their infection. Our evolving knowledge should not reduce attention paid to women admitted for COVID-19.”

###

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R24AG064191, R01LM012836, R01 NR018443. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

About the Journal

Journal of Women’s Health, published monthly, is a core multidisciplinary journal dedicated to the diseases and conditions that hold greater risk for or are more prevalent among women, as well as diseases that present differently in women. Led by Editor-in-Chief Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women’s Health, Richmond, VA, the Journal covers the latest advances and clinical applications of new diagnostic procedures and therapeutic protocols for the prevention and management of women’s healthcare issues. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Journal of Women’s Health website. Journal of Women’s Health is the official journal of the Society for Women’s Health Research.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research. A complete list of the

Source: https://bioengineer.org/sex-differences-in-covid-19-outcomes/

sex-differences-in-covid-19-outcomes

Continue Reading

Bioengineer

UTHSC awarded $1.5 million HRSA grant for sexual assault nurse examiner training

Credit: UTHSC Memphis, Tenn. (June 16, 2021) – The University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s College of Nursing has received

Published

on

Memphis, Tenn. (June 16, 2021) – The University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s College of Nursing has received a three-year, $1.5 million grant from the Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to fund a much-needed expansion of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) training and certification in West Tennessee.

SANE programs are designed to train nurses to address survivors’ needs and provide trauma-informed care. The 21 counties of West Tennessee have only five certified SANE nurses, four of whom practice in Shelby County. But the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation received nearly 1,600 reports of sexual assault in West Tennessee in 2019, indicating a significant shortage of nurses certified to meet the need for this care.

Andrea Sebastian, DNP, PNP, SANE-P, an assistant professor in the UTHSC College of Nursing, has worked as a child abuse nurse practitioner for the last seven years at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and will serve as project manager of the SANE Training and Education through Partnerships for Underserved Populations (STEP UP) grant.

“During this time, I have recognized the importance of SANE nurses in our community. Currently, we do not have enough SANE nurses in West Tennessee to provide exams and resources to victims,” Dr. Sebastian said. “With this grant, we will be able to increase access to these invaluable resources and help victims of sexual assault in our community.”

The UTHSC team will work with West Tennessee Healthcare, the Shelby County Crime Victims and Rape Crisis Center, and the Whiteville Family Medical Clinic on the project. The team’s goal is to transform the nursing workforce by increasing the supply, distribution, and retention of certified SANEs and improving access to timely, expert care for all sexual assault survivors in West Tennessee.

Assistant Professor Christie Manasco, PhD, RN, is one of the co-investigators on the grant. “The funding from this grant will significantly help us close the gaps to equitable SANE care in West Tennessee. The efforts supported by these funds will help us to reduce inequalities and disparities and promote better outcomes for survivors,” she said.

Beginning in July, the STEP UP grant team will launch a plan to recruit up to 61 registered nurses or advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) from the West Tennessee counties, with a focus on the rural and underserved areas. The grant will pay for participants to earn certifications through community or academic programs for adult and pediatric patients, known as SANE-A® and SANE-P®.

The grant team will also work with regional stakeholders to develop and implement a regional Sexual Assault Response and Resource Team (SARRT) that will assess the needs for sexual assault services in the area, reduce barriers to SANE training, and coordinate SANE clinical training opportunities. Grant funding also will be used to develop and provide resources for SANE self-care, peer mentoring, continuing education, and recertification.

Dr. Sebastian will be supported on this grant by co-investigators including Dr. Manasco, Assistant Professor Lisa Beasley, DNP, APRN, NP-C, RN; Assistant Professor Sally Humphrey, DNP, ARN, CPNP-PC; and Assistant Professor Diana Dedmon, DNP, FNP-BC, director of Clinical Affairs. College of Nursing Dean Wendy Likes, PhD, DNSc, APRN-Bc, FAANP, will serve as women’s health adviser on the grant, and the program coordinator for the Doctor of Nursing Practice DNP program, Trimika Bowdre, PhD, MPH, will be the evaluation adviser.

“The College of Nursing is very grateful for the funding to support this important work of providing appropriate care to this very vulnerable group of people,” Dr. Likes said. “The need for this in West Tennessee is beyond question. I personally look forward to working with this team in the College of Nursing and our community partners to provide this vital service to our communities.”

###

As Tennessee’s only public, statewide, academic health system, the mission of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center is to bring the benefits of the health sciences to the achievement and maintenance of human health through education, research, clinical care, and public service, with a focus on the citizens of Tennessee and the region. The main campus in Memphis includes six colleges: Dentistry, Graduate Health Sciences, Health Professions, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy. UTHSC also educates and trains medicine, pharmacy, and/or health professions students, as well as medical residents and fellows, at major sites in Knoxville, Chattanooga and Nashville. For more information, visit http://www.uthsc.edu. Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/uthsc, on Twitter: twitter.com/uthsc and on Instagram: instagram.com/uthsc.

Source: https://bioengineer.org/uthsc-awarded-1-5-million-hrsa-grant-for-sexual-assault-nurse-examiner-training/

uthsc-awarded-$1.5-million-hrsa-grant-for-sexual-assault-nurse-examiner-training

Continue Reading

Bioengineer

Pioneering chemistry approach could lead to more robust soft electronics

Credit: Udit Chakraborty, Cornell University RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C. — A new approach to studying conjugated polymers made it possible

Published

on

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C. — A new approach to studying conjugated polymers made it possible for an Army-funded research team to measure, for the first time, the individual molecules’ mechanical and kinetic properties during polymerization reaction. The insights gained could lead to more flexible and robust soft electronic materials, such as health monitors and soft robotics.

Conjugated polymers are essentially clusters of molecules strung along a backbone that can conduct electrons and absorb light. This makes them a perfect fit for creating soft optoelectronics, such as wearable electronic devices; however, as flexible as they are, these polymers are difficult to study in bulk because they aggregate and fall out from solution.

“Conjugated polymers are a fascinating class of materials due to their inherent optical and electronic properties which are dictated by their polymer structure,” said Dr. Dawanne Poree, program manager, U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command, known as DEVCOM, Army Research Laboratory. “These materials are highly relevant to a number of applications of interest to Army and DoD including portable electronics, wearable devices, sensors, and optical communication systems. To date, unfortunately, it has been difficult to develop conjugated polymers for targeted applications due to a lack of viable tools to study and correlate their structure-property relationships.”

With Army funding, researchers at Cornell University employed an approach they pioneered on other synthetic polymers, called magnetic tweezers, that allowed them to stretch and twist individual molecules of the conjugated polymer polyacetylene. The research was published in the journal Chem.

“Through the use of novel single-molecule manipulation and imaging approaches, this work provided the first observations of single-chain behaviors in conjugated polymers which lays the foundation for the rational design and processing of these materials to enable widespread application,” Poree said.

Previous efforts to address the solubility of conjugated polymers have often relied upon chemical derivatization, in which the structures are modified with functional groups of atoms. However, that approach can affect the polymer’s innate properties.

“The conjugated polymer is really a prototype,” said Dr. Peng Chen, the Peter J.W. Debye professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Cornell. “You always modify it to tailor it for applications. We are hoping everything we measured – the fundamental properties of synthesis kinetics, the mechanical property – become benchmark numbers for people to think about other polymers of the same category.”

In 2017, Chen’s group was the first to use the magnetic tweezers measurement technique to study living polymerization, visualizing it at the single-molecule level. The technique had already been used in the biophysics field for studying DNA and proteins, but no one had successfully extended it to the realm of synthetic polymers.

The process works by affixing one end of a polymer strand to a glass coverslip and the other end to a tiny magnetic particle. The researchers then use a magnetic field to manipulate the conjugated polymer, stretching or twisting it, and measuring the response of a single polymer chain that grows.

The amounts are so small, they stay soluble in solution, the way bulk amounts normally would not.

The team measured how long chains of conjugated polymers, which consist of hundreds of thousands of monomer units, grow in real time. They discovered these polymers add a new monomer per second, a much faster growth than their nonconjugated analogs.

“We found that while growing in real time, this polymer forms conformational entanglements,” Chen said. “All polymers we have studied form conformational entanglements, but for this conjugated polymer this conformational entanglement is looser, allowing it to grow faster.”

By pulling and stretching individual conjugated polymers, so-called force extension measurements, the researchers were able to assess their rigidity and better understand how they can bend in different directions while remaining conjugated and retaining electron conductivity.

They also discovered the polymers displayed diverse mechanical behaviors from one individual chain to the next-behaviors that had been predicted by theory but never observed experimentally.

The findings highlight both the uniqueness of conjugated polymers for a range of applications as well as the strength of using a single-molecule manipulation and imaging technique on synthetic materials.

“Now we have a new way to study how these conjugated polymers are made chemically and what is the fundamental mechanical property of this type of material,” Chen said. “We can study how these fundamental properties change when you start tailoring them for application purposes. Maybe you can make it more mechanically flexible and make the polymer longer, or adjust the synthesis condition to either synthesize the polymer in a faster or slower way.”

###

Visit the laboratory’s Media Center to discover more Army science and technology stories

As the Army’s national research laboratory, ARL is operationalizing science to achieve transformational overmatch. Through collaboration across the command’s core technical competencies, we lead in the discovery, development and delivery of the technology-based capabilities required to make Soldiers more successful at winning the nation’s wars and come home safely. DEVCOM Army Research Laboratory is an element of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command. DEVCOM is a major subordinate command of the Army Futures Command.

Source: https://bioengineer.org/pioneering-chemistry-approach-could-lead-to-more-robust-soft-electronics/

pioneering-chemistry-approach-could-lead-to-more-robust-soft-electronics

Continue Reading

Title

Reuters2 days ago

Eco-friendly sneaker maker Allbirds aims for $2 bln valuation in U.S. IPO

Eco-friendly sneaker maker Allbirds Inc said on Monday it aims to be valued at over $2 billion in its New...

ZDNET3 days ago

Comcast gave me good, precise news. The truth was precisely the opposite

Many companies believe that technology is perfect for customer service communication. Often, though, it just isn't.

Bioengineer6 days ago

Sex differences in COVID-19 outcomes

Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers In a study of more than 10,600 adult patients hospitalized with COVID-19, women had

Techcrunch1 week ago

Resistant AI scores $16.6M for its anti-fraud fintech tools – TechCrunch

Resistant AI, which uses artificial intelligence to help financial services companies combat fraud and financial crime — selling tools to...

Techcrunch1 week ago

Facebook reportedly plans to change its name to focus on the metaverse – TechCrunch

Facebook is planning to rebrand the company with a new name to focus on building the metaverse, according to a...

Bioengineer1 week ago

UTHSC awarded $1.5 million HRSA grant for sexual assault nurse examiner training

Credit: UTHSC Memphis, Tenn. (June 16, 2021) - The University of Tennessee Health Science Center's College of Nursing has received

Techcrunch1 week ago

Does the NFT craze actually matter? – TechCrunch

Hello friends, and welcome back to Week in Review! Last week, we talked about Apple’s subscription addiction. This week, I’m...

CNBC2 weeks ago

Earnings

Corporate Company Earnings, Find Earnings Per Share and Earnings History Online

ZDNET2 weeks ago

Even computer experts think ending human oversight of AI is a very bad idea

The UK government is thinking of scrapping the right to ask for a human to review decisions made entirely by...

Crunchbase2 weeks ago

The Briefing: Hailo Lands $136M Series C

Crunchbase News' top picks of the news to stay current in the VC and startup world.

Review

    Select language

    Trending